Monday, 27 May 2019

Antonym - Statues in Ice (1992) C50


Can't even find this one on Discogs, so 1992 is a guess. I expect I still have the letter from Mr. Burnham reading Dear Loz, here is my tape of rare stuff but I can't be arsed to look to check the date. Also, he probably wouldn't have described it as rare stuff, because that's more like the sort of dumb shit I used to do: well, I've sold five copies of that last tape so now its time to issue a cassette of my rare recordings... Anthony had more sense than that, so this is a tape of leftovers, or something in that general direction, which admittedly may not sound too promising, but there's some nice stuff here. It may, if you're about the same age as I am, initially remind you of the straight and curly animation sequences they used to have on Rainbow - Bungle not Blackmore - but stick with it as it gets its hooks into you.
It was a bit difficult to tell quite where a couple of these tracks ended and others began, particularly with Warp I and Woven Glass, but hopefully I got it right.


Tracks:
1 - Warp I
2 - Woven Glass
3 - The Bonnicon
4 - Inherit the Earth?
5 - Pikadon
6 - Persistence
7 - Warp II
8 - Weft
9 - Kinetic Workhorse I
10 - Kinetic Workhorse II
11 - Primordial Cry
12 - Black Velvet Void
13 - Scarsnarl
14 - Fracturhythm

 

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Friday, 17 May 2019

Impulse 8 (1996) C30


Here's my final Impulse compilation. For some reason I don't have the magazine that came with this one, yet I have issue seven but no tape, so issue seven is included with the download for the sake of tying up a loose end. You should know most of these names, but for the record: Splintered were something to do with Richo Johnson of Grim Humour and Adverse Effect zines, and as such probably qualify as the best band ever to involve a bloke who writes a fanzine, possibly excepting Alternative TV. Discogs seems to think the Richard Johnson of Aphasia is a different person, but personally I'm sceptical. Even my wife's 93-year old Texan grandmother has a couple of tapes by Illusion of Safety, so there's no excuse for ignorance regarding the same. Cathedra was Mark who wrote Impulse (and as such is exempt from any statements about bands formed by blokes who write fanzines), later of Konstruktivists, and whose Codex Empire have just put out a double vinyl album about which I've heard only good things. Day of the Moon was in Evil Twin with Karl Blake, and Band of Pain was something to do with Steve Pittis of Dirter Promotions.
 
Had to apply an unusual amount of noise reduction to this one - the silences were filled with this sort of low-level digital susurrus suggesting a virtual rather than physical master copy, but I think it's come out sounding okay.


Tracks:
1 - Splintered - Smokescreen (Impulse mix)
2 -
Illusion of Safety - Altered Locations
3 -
Aphasia - Based on a Disturbed Glance (edit)
4 -
Cathedra - Relegatio
5 -
Day of the Moon - Night of Knives
6 -
Band of Pain - Fake Shit (Drone Mood)
7 -
Konstruktivists - Midnight Mass (short mix)

 
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Friday, 10 May 2019

Apostles - Live at the Academy 108 (1989) C90


Here's my last Apostles tape, which is a bit of a relief. Weirdly, I have no memory of having acquired this one, or listening to it up until about a week ago - not sure why. This fact seems additionally mysterious given that it may even be their best, or their best which isn't Second Dark Age if you prefer.

'But Loz,' I hear you cry, 'how can that be? The Apostles were notoriously ropey live, and this is surely a recording of some gig.'

Well, yes, but as Andy explains on the cover, it was recorded direct from the microphones and is therefore good quality because there's no audience sound - which I'm sure will make sense to our technically minded subscribers. I haven't read the rest of the cover because I've spent quite enough time squinting at microscopic type over the last month, but I expect there will be some account of how our man did such a good job playing the guitar whilst singing at the same time, something he used to have trouble with. Actually, he seems to be playing a couple of guitars at the same time on a few of these tracks, which must have taken some practice, and was surely a treat for everyone who attended this event which was definitely a genuine live gig with an audience and probably a bloke selling pies at the back.

My guess is that this was some sort of Apostles bowing out thing, hence all the old favourites - and definitive recordings too - plus covers of tracks by Chelsea, the Pop Group, and er... whatever that last track was. Certainly it seems like a precursor to Academy 23, not least with thee spellings which I've ignored because I'm a grown man; and Pagga in Pilrig was relocated to Pilton and became an Academy 23 standard.

If anyone doesn't get the Apostles, this is probably the one to listen to.


Tracks:
1 - We Are All Prostitutes
2 - High Rise Living
3 - Urban Kids
4 - After the Fact
5 - Pigs for Slaughter
6 - Mister Missed Her
7 - Kings Cross Etc.
8 - Thalidomide
9 - The Sword
10 - Daze of the Weak
11 - New Face in N16
12 - Pagga in Pilrig
13 - Mistreated
14 - Our Mother, the Earth
15 - The Hunt
16 - 5.975MHz
17 - The Visitors
18 - Fucking Queer
19 - A Case History
20 - Pig Violence
21 - Walking Away
22 - The Witness
23 - For You

 
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Monday, 6 May 2019

Mlehst - Occasional Stimulation / She Made Me a Sadist (1995) C60


Only now has it occurred to me that the name seems to be a phonetic spelling of the word molest. Anyway, I don't know a massive amount about this guy, although I met him once and found him very personable - according to my diary. I'm told he made a point of destroying his master tapes so as to preserve the preciousness of the artefacts, or something, so hopefully I'm not stepping on anyone's toes by sharing this. No track list with this one as it comprises one long piece of reassuringly expensive sounding noise per side, and was actually a reissue of a couple of C30s previously issued by labels other than Bandaged Hand. Needless to say I can't find mention of any of them on Discogs so I assume he was simply more prolific than anyone could keep track of.



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